Photo 191-Photomerge

April 18, 2010

For our third class assignment we were taught how to merge multiple images in Photoshop CS4 to make one single image. Our instructor, Neil Sharum, asked us to shoot a minimum of three images. We could either choose to do a standard panorama or shoot one scene, on a tripod, slightly changing the scene a little with each shot. Bryan and I chose the latter. There are two techniques to merge photos in Photoshop. The first requires you to open up all the images you intend to merge, then go to FILE —> AUTOMATE —> PHOTOMERGE. This merges the three images, however the final merge can sometimes look ridiculous, for example, my final photomerge had no subjects in it. After the merge is done you most likely have to do some tweaking. Bryan and I both had to paint our subjects back into the picture. You do this by using the paint brush tool on the layer mask that is created for each photo.
 
The second way to merge photos is to again open all the images you would like to merge but this time open them side by side. Choose the photo that you would like to be your background image and drag the other photos on top of it. Then in the LAYERS tab create layer masks for the two photos that you dragged on top of your background. Use the paint bucket tool to make these layer masks black and then with the paint brush tool paint your subjects back in. This sounds completely complicated but it is actually very simple as long as the photographs you are using are photographed correctly. Below are the images Bryan and I created.

Photomerge by Jamie

Photomerge by Bryan

Photo 191: Portraits

April 6, 2010

For our second project in our digital photography class we were asked to do portraits. I chose to do environmental portraits of my coworkers. To make my photos a little more artsy I converted them to black & white and added noise in Photoshop to make them have a more grainy film feel. I think they were very successful. I call my series; “Life in Customer Service”.

Bryan did his own environmental portraits while at the Dirt Devil Race. He shot his photos when the sun was coming up over Mission Trails so he got very beautiful golden light.

Photo 191: Point of View

March 15, 2010

Recently Bryan and I enrolled in a digital photography class at Santa Ana College. Although we are both very savvy in digital photography we decided to take the course to brush up on our Photoshop skills since we don’t have very much experience in that area. The first project we were given was called point of view. Our instructor, Neil Sharum, required us to pick a subject or a theme and shoot it from a different point of view. The rules were to find a different perspective to shoot from, he explicitly stated that we could not shoot at eye level. Both of our projects were well received by our fellow students.

Bryan chose and architectural theme for his project. We went down to the Anaheim Convention Center to get his shots.

I chose Irvine Regional Park to shoot my project. I consider my theme to be “Rural America”.

Photographics: Final Portfolio

June 12, 2009

Our final project for Photographics required us to put together a portfolio of images that we created in the class. The portfolio was to be 8-14 images, mounted with some kind of theme or uniformity to them. Some students chose a flower theme, some did all lumen prints, some did a variety of different tones. I was really impressed with the quality of work from our fellow classmates. Some of them are masters in the darkroom and many have a great eye for composition, most of them blew my portfolio away, they were just so good. Bryan chose to use his best images that he had turned in throughout the semester for his portfolio. I decided to do a batch of fresh images. I took two older film photos and reworked them digitally. For each photo I did a sepia toned image, a sabbatier, an applied color, a high contrast and a lith. The professor and my fellow students liked the idea and thought it was interesting to see a variation on one image side by side. Below is my portfolio.

Sepia by Jamie

Sepia by Jamie

High Contrast by Jamie

High Contrast by Jamie

Applied Color by Jamie

Applied Color by Jamie

Sabbatier by Jamie

Sabbatier by Jamie

Lith by Jamie

Lith by Jamie

Sepia by Jamie

Sepia by Jamie

High Contrast by Jamie

High Contrast by Jamie

Applied Color by Jamie

Applied Color by Jamie

Sabbatier by Jamie

Sabbatier by Jamie

Lith by Jamie

Lith by Jamie

Photographics: Lith

June 4, 2009

Our last assignment for our class was to do a lith print. Lith printing done in the traditional wet darkroom requires the use of a special developer to produce a print that looks grainy. I don’t quite understand the point of lith printing but the results do have a nice look to them. For our lith prints we once again chose to do them digitally. We first desaturated and sepia toned the images in Digital Photo Professional and than added noise to them in GIMP. We also adjusted the highlights/contrast to get a more lithy look. I really liked the final results of our photo manipulation, it makes them look like old photographs.

Photo by Bryan

Photo by Bryan

Photo by Bryan

Photo by Bryan

Photo by Jamie

Photo by Jamie

Photo by Jamie

Photo by Jamie

Photographics: Lumen Prints

May 29, 2009

For one of our class projects we were required to do lumen prints. Lumen prints are very simple to do and the end result is very cool. To do a lumen print you first take a piece of photo paper, fiber or RC, out in direct sunlight and then proceed to put objects on the paper to create a design. Depending on the amount of sunlight available you would leave these pieces of photo paper out for a few hours. The minimum would be about three hours but some of our fellow students left them out for up eight hours. After waiting you would then take your exposed photo paper and put it straight into the fixer and watch your image appear. For our lumen prints we used cold toned, glossy RC paper. We used Bryan’s grandparents backyard along with a few of their garden plants to make our images. It was overcast that day and kind of windy. We used large pieces of Lexan to hold the flowers and leaves down on the photo paper and let it expose for four and a half hours. The great thing about lumen prints is you never know what colors or shades you will get once you put the paper in the fixer. Each image is truly one of a kind. Our classmates images looked totally different from our images below. Some got deep browns, oranges, reds, yellows, and even purples. I really enjoyed this project and hope I get the chance to do it again.

Print by Bryan

Print by Bryan

Print by Bryan

Print by Bryan

Print by Jamie

Print by Jamie

Print by Jamie

Print by Jamie

« Previous PageNext Page »